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One in Four

With 450 IVF babies born in New Zealand every year and one in four couples in Aotearoa struggling with fertility, why do we find this kōrero so hard?

WHEN
15 Oct
3:00pm
WHERE
University of Waikato, Tauranga Campus View Map
DURATION
60 minutes
TICKET
$20 (Booking fees apply)
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With 450 IVF babies born in New Zealand every year and one in four couples in Aotearoa struggling with fertility, why do we find this kōrero so hard?

In this panel discussion, we explore the multitude of ways one can conceive a baby in the 21st century, new models of family-making, and the taboos around IVF, surrogacy and other assisted fertility options.

Fertility issues are more common than we realise and our panellists - recently retired fertility counsellor Sue Saunders (Maybe Baby), and actor and author, Michelle Langstone, who writes about her IVF journey in her outstanding novel Times Like These – bravely talk with Elisabeth Easther about their experiences, and about the grief, hope, science and the magic of making babies.

Sponsored By Kathryn Lellman Barrister

Wheelchair friendly eventElisabeth Easther

Elisabeth Easther is a writer, actor and broadcaster. Writing for magazines, newspapers and the stage she also works for a number of conservation organisations and is fixated on pest control, weeding, litter collection and marine protection. She also likes to ride her bike wherever possible in favour of using a car even if it means she looks relatively disheveled whenever she goes anywhere.

Michelle Langstone

Michelle Langstone is a writer and actor from Auckland. Her debut collection of essays is Time Like These.

Sue Saunders

Sue Saunders is a trained counsellor who has worked for a major fertility clinic in New Zealand for 19 years. Prior to that she worked as a senior lecturer in Human Resources and Communication at Wellington College of Education, and as a counsellor at Wellington School of Medicine. She has a BA from Otago University, a Diploma of Education and a Masters in Guidance and Counselling.

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